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Acrof
Newbie
I've got a NUSM-001(BRA), probably because I live in Brazil and my console was manufactured here, I wonder if it has the same guts of an American N64 NUSCPU-001 console. It does play NTSC games, and everything American related works on it, with exception of Hey You Pikachu! (They say that this game, by needing English-only voice commands, was not suitable to the Brazilian audience--Portuguese speakers--so they made a lock of sorts that prevent this game from running in a Brazilian console.)

The color signal here is PAL-M, Brazilian standard back then, it's basically PAL, but running at 60Hz. =P

Before showing pictures of my Brazilian N64, I'd like to give a little more background:

During the 80s and 90s, two major companies manufactured videogame consoles here in Brazil.

TEC TOY did Sega related products, and had an awesome support for their nationalized consoles. To the point they provided full game translations and even their own games. It was a company that made electronic toys (as you can guess from the name), and made so much success here, that Brazil is one of the few markets where the Master System beat the s* out of the NES.

This company still exists, and still manufactures cheapo Megadrives and Master Systems, not too long ago it produced it's own console, named Zeebo, a complete commercial failure. It still makes cheapo DVD players and other electronics. They made every Sega system ever released here (and even some that don't exist anywhere else in the world) from the Master System to the Dreamcast (including games and accessories).

GRADIENTE did Nintendo related products, often under the name Playtronic. Their support was good, but not as great as Tec Toy's. Unlike TecToy though, Gradiente was specialized at electronics such as TVs and Stereos, I remember they made awesome Hi-Fi audio equipment back in the 80s. (It actualy made products so good, that it was hard to choose between an big branded product, like Sony or Panasonic, or a Gradiente product). It started in the game industry with the NES, and produced every nintendo console from that to the Game Cube (games and accessories too). After that, it went bankrupt, and no longer made consoles or any other electronics.

Right now, Gradiente is slooooowly coming back from the grave, releasing (not so great) tablets and smart phones in the market. However, is not even a shadow of what in once was.

Sony? Well, it wasn't officially present in the country as far as videogames go, so basically anything you bought was imported.

Now that you had a little background, let's look at the Gradiente/Playtronic Nintendo 64, shall we?

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Warning sticker written in portuguese, it reads: "Do not remove the Jumper from the console. Check the instruction manual."

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"Warning: Use only with the included AC adapter.
Manufactured by Gradiente Entertainment Limited under license from Nintendo of America INC.
Brazilian industry. 1996 Nintendo. All rights reserved."
Below that is the address where this unit was assembled, wich would be Manaus, capital of the state of Amazonas (yeah, we have a state with that name xD).

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Serial number from Gradiente. Most of it's products have this same sticker.

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Cartridge slot, you can see it's got the american's N64 physical locks for the cartridges.



Now to the AC Adapter....


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Euro standard plug. Here most of our wall outlets support both american and euro plugs, though brazilian companies can only use the euro standard on their electronics.

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"Warning: Only for domestic use.
-Use only with the Nintendo 64 console.
-Do not open, risk of electric shock."
Below that is where the PSU was assembled, again, in Manaus.

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Self explanatory. The ony fun fact about it is that it is in fact, a multi voltage PSU. We have both 127V and 220V here in Brazil. 220V is more common to the north, 127V is more common to the south, like where I live. And yes, it does work with 110V.

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How it looks when the PSU is plugged in. I've heard it is bigger and sticks out a little bit more than the american PSU, I can't confirm that as I have never compared both.

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Voltage output pinout.


The controller...


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By the side is my copy of Pokemon silver, also made by Gradiente.

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Another sticker saying where it was assembled, and that it was licensed by Nintendo.


The weird part is...
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"MADE IN JAPAN"?? xD Maybe they didn't want to waste time in customizing the plastic shell. lol


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With my Transfer Pak, this one is american.


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As you can see, works with foreign accessories.



The game cartridges....



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Both made by Gradiente, note that the Mario 64 has the PLAYTRONIC logo instead of the Gradiente logo on the Pokemon Stadium.
Both games are in english, no difference whatsoever in the gameplay from the american version you all know.
As you can see from my Stadium 2 and Pokemon Silver cartridges, they came with normal labels, here they don't have that metallic shine on them, shame.


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Backside of the cartridges.

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Serial sticker from Gradiente.
The back label has all the standard stuff in portuguese.
"The system must be turned off before inserting or removing the cartridge.
Do not turn on and off the system repeatedly.
Do not blow or touch the conector with your fingers.
Do not let it get wet, nor expose it to high temperatures.
Check the instruction manual for extra precautions and details on maintenace."
As expected, assembled in Manaus.




Well this is it for today. I still have the box of this system (though it's not in good shape), and I'll take pictures later.
Internal pictures I'll try to take tomorrow.

Hope you liked what you saw so far. ;)
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