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Controller discussion; N64 controller discussion - collecting/issues/help
Topic Started: Jul 23 2006, 12:29 AM (43,561 Views)
danny_galaga
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nice collection so far (",)

And congrats on Paper Mario. Being in Australia too, I know how they go for...
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danny_galaga
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Unusual. But probably easier to just get another controller...
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danny_galaga
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Whatever you do though, don't throw your old one out. I have a cunning plan (that's been in the works for years of course) that can make use of your old ones...
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danny_galaga
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l0whit07
Mar 1 2010, 07:58 AM


As far as wheels go, I read the review on the interact vortex and thought it looked completely awesome. However, I've checked a few times and never seen one for sale so I didn't include it in my options. I would definitely like to find that one though. I'll probably get an ultra racer just for collecting purposes and its extremely cheap, but I would like a usable wheel.

Definitely give the Ultraracer a go. Like you say, it's pretty cheap. Opinions vary wildly on it (",).

See the controller reviews here for reviews by alxbly and me (mines the last one added. alxblys is post 26)
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danny_galaga
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Lubrication of these sorts of parts were always going to be problematic for the manufacturer. That 'dust' we see when we pull apart a thumbstick is actually dry lubricant. It's advantage is that it always gets back into the areas that need lubricating the most. As a lube it's not as good as grease. Problem with grease of course is that after a little while, it rubs off exactly where it's needed most.

The ideal thing thing on larger machinery is an oil bath. That way parts are continually being relubricated. An oil bath setup on our thumbsticks is never going to work of course, the oil will leak out everywhere. Oil is what the dry lube is trying to emulate. Graphite powder would be a better lubricant, but it is highly conductive, and i suspect over a period of time, will find it's way onto the pcb that runs the optical encoder. I bet this is why they didn't use graphite in the first place. Also, any leakage out will be quite 'dirty'. I might have to experiment. The shorting won't cause any damage. The controller will just become more and more problematic (i predict various probs. Maybe analog never centres. Or one axis becomes less responsive than the other. etc). CLeaning the graphite off the pcbs will fix it.
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danny_galaga
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alxbly
Mar 13 2010, 05:20 AM
danny_galaga
Mar 13 2010, 01:11 AM
That 'dust' we see when we pull apart a thumbstick is actually dry lubricant.

No it's not, it's plastic dust from the wearing down of the internal parts of the controller. You can see this quite clearly if you compare a brand new official controller's control stick with one which has been used enough for the dust to build up
Man, this means the 'new' thumbsticks i've bought aren't new :( . They definitely had dry lube in them, so that means someone else has been in there. Can you not trust ANYTING you buy on Ebay? :lol:
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danny_galaga
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I saw a youtube 'how to' somewhere, where the guy was superglueing thin strips of paper to the worn out 'slides'. That would help somewhat, so long as the papers surface was coated, as superglue sets quite hard. There aren't any substances that i can think of that will last longer than that setup. Not a perfect scenario, but at least some of the slack will be taken out. Best results would be with the most worn out ones...

I have no idea why people think they have refurbished a thumbstick by adding lube. To me it's akin to pressure-cleaning a car engine and saying you've just reconditioned it!
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danny_galaga
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Anything old school like nail polish would be useless. The rubbing parts will pretty much scrape nail polish off within minutes. As well as being relatively soft, nail polish won't really bond to the plastic. Two fails in one :D
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danny_galaga
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bluedogrulez
Apr 5 2010, 10:01 AM

Looks way too complicated for me. Nearly all of my krazy glue projects end with the wrong things being stuck together!


:D

Yep, i mostly get my fingers stuck to whatever it was i as trying to glue
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danny_galaga
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alxbly
Apr 15 2010, 04:14 PM
bluedogrulez
Apr 14 2010, 12:39 PM
I am now wondering if those Hong Kong "high quality" N64 OEM clones (which I hear aren't so good), have the same thumbstick guts as the OEM to harvest . . .
They don't. I kind of covered this when I reviewed one of them:

http://s9.zetaboards.com/Nintendo_64_Forever/single/?p=8003822&t=7186633

The connections are completely different and the parts are made from poor quality plastic; I'd be very surprised if they last anywhere near as long as official controllers do. And... the control sticks they have aren't actually very good to start with (they do have specific issues which are described in the review).



And it's not just that. All current aftermarket N64 controllers use a different system altogether. The original N64 (and definitely the best :) ) uses two optical quadrature encoders in the thumbstick. Quadrature encoders are what you found in the older mouse (mice? meese? mouses?) with the trackball. They give relative positional information in the form of a series of pulses to a chip which then gives a signal to the console. The encoder tells the chip what direction it's turning, and how fast. But not exactly where it's at. Which is why if you turn on the console with the thumbstick not centred, for the rest of the game, your controls are out.

All these new aftermarket controllers use two potentiometers to give that information. The potentiometer is a variable resistor and gives an absolute position in the form of a resitive value to a chip, which then sends a signal to the console.

They are fundamentally different ways to send a signal. This is the reason why there are a different number of wires coming out of the thumbstick. I think a few of us here have pulled apart an aftermarket controller in the hopes that we could pilfer the thumbstick to put in an original controller :D

Here's the relevant link to quadrature encoders for those curious about how they work:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rotary_encoder#Incremental_rotary_encoder
Edited by danny_galaga, Apr 16 2010, 07:40 PM.
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danny_galaga
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OldCartGamer
May 1 2010, 07:41 PM
D'OH! :facepalm: About a month ago I picked up an absolutely minty in box red N64 controller (official Nintendo). At the same time I ordered some Tamiya Cera-Grease to lube up the thumbstick. Upon opening up the stick housing, I was greeted by an absolutely new looking mechanism, not a single spec of powder, etc. So...I lubed it up, put it back together, and have been enjoying it ever since. Fast forward to last night. It's been slightly chilly here at night with very, very low humidity, the ideal situation for static electricity. I was sitting on my bed playing some Duke Nukem: Zero Hour, and I decided to get up an get something to drink. I step off the bed onto the carpet, controller in hand, when SNAP! a big old blue spark of static arcs between my fingers and the controller. It actually made the tv screen flicker. :unsure:

Yep, you guessed it, the controller is fried! If I plug it in now, it just casues random stuff to happen, depending upon the game. Oh, my beuatiful controller! I hardly knew ye! ;_;

The lesson: watch that static electricity. If it's one of those days when you're walking around the house zapping yourself on everything you touch, make sure to touch something before grabbing a cart or controller, and be sure to put the controller down before you get up out of your chair, off your bed, etc.

Oh crap! At least you can swap out all the electronics and still have all the new plastic bits...
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danny_galaga
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It's really, rally simple. If you can use a screwdriver, you can do it! No need for pics. Just pull it apart and you'll see...
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danny_galaga
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Just picked up this bad boy

http://cgi.ebay.com.au/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=320566917075&ssPageName=STRK:MEWNX:IT#ht_500wt_949

Who knows how well they work. But I haven't bought any N64 accessories or carts for ages now. Couldn't resist (",)
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danny_galaga
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alxbly
Jul 26 2010, 01:53 PM
I seen a brand new boxed on of these a few years ago but forgot to bid. >_< There's a topic about it somewhere (or it's part of the controller discussion). Anyway, let us know how well it does or doesn't work. :)

I'm sure it won't be an earth moving experience, but that's not the point of collecting, is it? :D
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danny_galaga
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Only just noticed your vid. Nice work! Very articulate and insightful (",)

And damn, that's a huge collection! I only started collection consoles about 3 years ago, and N64 was the first for me.

I think you need to do something a bit nicer with your TV though :D
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danny_galaga
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kami of time
Sep 10 2010, 10:01 AM
Thanks guys =]
I think the only way to play N64 games, is on a old school tv =] makes me feel like i'm playing it back in the good old days!

Agreed! But maybe not sitting on the ground :D
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danny_galaga
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kami of time
Sep 13 2010, 01:21 PM
danny_galaga
Sep 10 2010, 06:56 PM

Quoting limited to 2 levels deep
Good point!! I'll figure something out ;]

I don't suppose you live in Oregon? This could be just the thing (",)

http://cgi.ebay.com.au/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=160386514437
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danny_galaga
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What ddr says. PIck up another one. The thumbstick is the hardest thing to find in good condition nowadays. So if your thumbsticks are like new as you say, put those in the next controller you pick up. You should be able to pick up controllers with wrecked thumbsticks for a song, maybe even free...
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danny_galaga
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Matt
Mar 17 2011, 02:06 PM
That Rare N64 looks photoshopped to me, But if it's real I want it :P

I'm more curious about that gold rare cart, Goldeneye?

It would have to be, wouldn't it?
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