Welcome Guest [Log In] [Register]
Welcome to Nintendo 64 Forever. We hope you enjoy your visit.


You're currently viewing our forum as a guest. This means you are limited to certain areas of the board and there are some features you can't use. If you join our community, you'll be able to access member-only sections, and use many member-only features such as customizing your profile, sending personal messages, and voting in polls. Registration is simple, fast, and completely free.


Join our community!


If you're already a member please log in to your account to access all of our features:

Username:   Password:
Add Reply
Nintendo 64 Games with versions + questions.
Topic Started: Aug 13 2013, 09:22 AM (15,932 Views)
speedruntrainer
Newbie
Some Nintendo 64 has versions of the cartridges like v1.0, v1.1 and v1.2. Most likely to fix glitches, freezing glitches and stuff.
I can't find it for every game what they fixed or altered. Here is a list of games and I put a description from what I know.

Aidyn Chronicles: The First Mage - v1.0, v1.1
Banjo Kazooie - v1.0, v1.1 - termite skip glitch fixed.
Blast Corps - v1.0, v1.1
Castlevania - v1.0, v1.1 - v1.2
Chameleon Twist - v1.0, v1.1
Cruis'n USA - v1.0, v1.1, v1.2
Diddy Kong Racing - v1.0, v1.1 - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ErZn46RY084
Doom 64 - v1.0, v1.1
Excitebike 64 - v1.0, v1.1
F-Zero X - v1.0, v1.1
International Superstar Soccer 2000 - v1.0, v1.1
Killer Instinct Gold - v1.0, v1.1, v1.2
The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time - v1.0, v1.1, v1.2 - http://zeldaspeedruns.com/oot/generalknowledge/version-differences
Turok 2: Seeds Of Evil - v1.0, v1.1
Mario Kart 64 - v1.0, v1.1 (PAL and JPN only)
Mischief Makers - v1.0, v1.1
Mortal Kombat Trilogy - v1.0, v1.1, v1.2
NFL Blitz 2000 - v1.0, v1.1
Ogre Battle 64: Person Of Lordly Calliber - v1.0, v1.1
Perfect Dark - v1.0, v1.1 - Challenge 7 3P freeze glitch fixed and invisible Trent from Cinama menu fixed in v1.1.
Pokemon Stadium - v1.0, v1.1, v1.2
Resident Evil 2 - v1.0, v1.1
San Francisco Rush: Extreme Racing - v1.0, v1.1
Scooby-Doo! Classic Creep Capers - v1.0, v1.1
Star Fox 64 - v1.0, v1.1
Star Wars: Shadows of the Empire - v1.0, v1.1, v1.2
Star Wars: Rogue Squadron - v1.0, v1.1
Tonic Trouble - v1.0, v1.1
Tony Hawk's Pro Skater - v1.0, v1.1
Turok: Dinosaur Hunter - v1.0, v1.1, v1.2
Turok: Rage Wars - v1.0, v1.1 - 2 player Tag the Monkey always lose glitch. v1.1 exists on the rare grey cart. Black carts has always v1.0.
Turok 2: Seeds Of Evil - v1.0, v1.1
Waialae Country Club True Golf Classics - v1.0, v1.1
Wave Race 64 - v1.0, v1.1
Wayne Gretzky's 3D Hockey - v1.0, v1.1
WCW vs. nWo: World Tour - v1.0, v1.1
WWF No Mercy - v1.0, v1.1

A helpful list to find out what you looking for.
What I'd like to know:

What are the differences in versions Mario Kart 64, Pokemon Stadium and Star Wars: Shadows of The Empire?
Edited by speedruntrainer, Aug 16 2013, 03:51 AM.
My Twitch Stream:
http://www.twitch.tv/speedruntrainer
Offline Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
Nuno
Member Avatar
Veteran
I'm always curious about these kind of things, however I have very little information about those versions. The only think I can tell you is that the PAL cartridges of Ocarina of Time are all v1.2, which is disappointing for me...
Edited by Nuno, Aug 14 2013, 04:38 AM.
Offline Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
speedruntrainer
Newbie
Not all PAL cartridges are v1.2, but most of them are. Mario Kart 64 v1.0 and v1.1 does exist, Diddy Kong Racing v1.0 and v1.1 and Pokemon Stadium too.
Edited by speedruntrainer, Aug 13 2013, 03:29 PM.
My Twitch Stream:
http://www.twitch.tv/speedruntrainer
Offline Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
Matt
Member Avatar
Kick, Punch, It's all in the mind
Banjo Kazooie is just bug fixes and a few texture changes I believe


There's also another version of Banjo Kazooie on Xbox 360. This has huge differences such as notes not resetting
Posted Image
Offline Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
Nuno
Member Avatar
Veteran
I'm sorry, I completely forgot to write the name of the game on my previous post.

Post corrected!
Offline Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
Cabanon
Elite
normally you see cart revision with a code revision as well so it's "easy" to identify which had revision, but in some cases, there's a revision without a product code change.

64DD front page has a list of game revision but none of these carts had code revision.
http://64dd.net/modules/news/
Offline Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
danilochka
Member Avatar
Weigh My Fish
The appended cartridge codes aren't always an indication of a revised ROM, quite often it seems it's used to denote a change in the actual artwork sticker and/or which packaging the cart should be part of.

For example there are three cart codes for Mario Kart 64 in the USA, though as far as I'm aware they all contain the exact same ROM image:
NUS-NKTE-USA - is for the original releases
NUS-NKTE-USA-1 - is for the first batch of Player's Choice releases (rated K-A)
NUS-NKTE-USA-2 - is for the second batch of Player's Choice releases (rated E)

There is, however, a way to identify if a game features a revised ROM and that is by checking the cart's punch code. You may have noticed these before, two seemingly random numbers 'punched' into the cartridge's back label. Nintendo have never released their true meaning but it's believed they somehow reference the production factory. If the punch code is, for exampe 19 then the ROM is for the first version of the game i.e. v1.0. The numbers themselves are not important, just that they don't end in letter, and that's becuase a punch code with 19A would contain a revised ROM of the game, v1.1 or Revision A. Likewise codes ending XXB or for v1.2 or Revision B and so on.

Here's a list of all currently known USA ROM revisions, I've highlighted in bold the ones missing from the OP's list:

  • Aidyn Chronicles: The First Mage
    USA (Rev A)


  • Banjo-Kazooie
    USA (Rev A)

  • Blast Corps
    USA (Rev A)

  • Castlevania
    USA (Rev A)

    USA (Rev B)

  • Chameleon Twist
    USA (Rev A)


  • Cruis'n USA
    USA (Rev A)
    USA (Rev B)

  • Diddy Kong Racing
    USA (Rev A)

  • Doom 64
    USA (Rev A)

  • Excitebike 64
    USA (Rev A)


  • F-Zero X
    USA (Rev A)


  • International Superstar Soccer 2000
    USA (Rev A)


  • Killer Instinct Gold
    USA (Rev A)
    USA (Rev B)

  • The Legend Of Zelda: Ocarina Of Time
    USA (Rev A)
    USA (Rev B)

  • Mischief Makers
    USA (Rev A)


  • Mortal Kombat Trilogy
    USA (Rev A)

    USA (Rev B)

  • NFL Blitz 2000
    USA (Rev A)


  • Ogre Battle 64: Person Of Lordly Calliber
    USA (Rev A)


  • Perfect Dark
    USA (Rev A)

  • Pokémon Stadium
    USA (Rev A)
    USA (Rev B)

  • Resident Evil 2
    USA (Rev A)

  • San Francisco Rush: Extreme Racing
    USA (Rev A)


  • Scooby-Doo! Classic Creep Capers
    USA (Rev A)


  • Star Fox 64
    USA (Rev A)

  • Star Wars: Rogue Squadron
    USA (Rev A)


  • Star Wars: Shadows Of The Empire
    USA (Rev A)
    USA (Rev B)

  • Tonic Trouble
    USA (Rev A)

  • Tony Hawk's Pro Skater
    USA (Rev A)

  • Turok: Dinosaur Hunter
    USA (Rev A)
    USA (Rev B)

  • Turok 2: Seeds Of Evil
    USA (Rev A)


  • Turok: Rage Wars
    USA (Rev A)

  • Waialae Country Club: True Golf Classic
    USA (Rev A)

  • Wave Race 64
    USA (Rev A)

  • Wayne Gretzky's 3D Hockey
    USA (Rev A)

  • WCW vs NwO: World Tour
    USA (Rev A)

  • WWF No Mercy
    USA (Rev A)

As these changes are usually to fix glitches and bugs, it's very hard to say what the changes are unless you're very familiar with both (or all) versions. Other than what has been already mentioned the only differences I know are that Banjo-Kazooie (Rev A) fixes the "termite skip", and Diddy Kong Racing (Rev A) removes some of the lasers from Spaceport Alpha.
Edited by danilochka, Aug 15 2013, 04:59 PM.
Posted Image
Offline Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
italia64
Member Avatar
Veteran
God bless Danilochka
Posted Image
Posted Image
Posted Image
Posted Image

Posted Image
Offline Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
Cabanon
Elite
I would have to find the thread but on NintendoAge there was athread about Zelda OOT punch code and people were asked about wether it was grey or gold and what punch code they had. i there was 2 of each 00A, 19A, 40 and 41, not too sure about the letter but lemme dig this thread

EDIT got it http://www.nintendoage.com/forum/messageview.cfm?catid=5&threadid=78775

and also Zelda differences in major explained mode http://zeldaspeedruns.com/oot/generalknowledge/version-differences
Edited by Cabanon, Aug 15 2013, 08:57 PM.
Offline Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
speedruntrainer
Newbie
Post updated. Didn't know I missed those Posted Image
I've heard of Pokemon Stadium v1.1 fixed the Chansey Freeze glitch? But I'm not sure so I didn't fill in this part.

But the start post is now v1.1 Posted Image
Edited by speedruntrainer, Aug 17 2013, 06:23 AM.
My Twitch Stream:
http://www.twitch.tv/speedruntrainer
Offline Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
Nagato
Member Avatar
Senior Member
Did not know this! A+ N64 Forever Buddies!!!!!
Offline Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
scooter77
Member Avatar
New Zealand Member
WOW, i dint know those puch codes on the back actually ment something LOL, you learn something new every day.
"Two things are infinite: the universe and human stupidity; and I'm not sure about the universe."
-Albert Einstein

PAL Collection: 243/243
NTSC-U only Exclusives: 50/50
NTSC-U / NTSC-J Exclusives: 11/11
NTSC-J only Exclusives: 85/85
64dd 0/9

Only 9 to go.
Offline Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
Robond
Member Avatar
Established Member
Awesome information as I'm a very curious guy.
Wii + 59 games + 7 Wii Ware + 28 VC! GC + 85 games! N64 + 38 games! DS + 32 games + 9 GBA games!
PS3 Slim + 16 games! PS2 Slim + 35 games! PS1 + 15 games!
Posted Image
Posted Image
Offline Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
myth
Member Avatar
Newbie
Does anyone know what the differences in Res 2 are?
Been reading N64 forever since 2013.
Snes & N64 forever!
Offline Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
super_joker
Member Avatar
Established Member
I don't care about what Version my Zelda OTT is, its limited edition Golden cartridge so that's all that matters.

I know the difference in WWF NO MERCY, V1.0 is the glitched version which resets game save data. V1.1 is unglitched and there is no blood in the game.

I assume most PAL games are V1.1 i have noticed a few little things with others, idk about JPN versions they seem to get it right the first time.
PRESS START
Posted Image
PRESS START
Offline Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
Tyree_Cooper
Member Avatar
Established Member
What are the numbers? Like 19A, does 19 indicate the week of production? There are 52/53 weeks in a year and I've never seen a number higher than 4X so it would make sense.
Edited by Tyree_Cooper, Oct 28 2017, 07:59 PM.
Offline Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
danilochka
Member Avatar
Weigh My Fish
That's an interesting theory, and one I hadn't considered. There's obviously some meaning to the punch code numbers, otherwise Nintendo wouldn't use them. However, since Nintendo haven't said what they are for (to my knowledge), fans are left to speculate.

I've started to keep track of punch codes in my collection, although not complete, here's a breakdown of the last 62 n64 carts I've purchased:

Punch CodeQuantity
001
014
031
076
088
092
114
122
194
2013
223
348
416


There is also this old thread from Nintendo Age where people have documented the punch codes for their Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time carts. Note: it contains an uncomfired 18 which is not present in my table:
http://nintendoage.com/forum/messageview.cfm?catid=5&threadid=78775

So far, these are the only 13 numbers I've seen used for n64 games, and for me this would go against them representing week numbers. They start counting from 00 and have big gaps in their sequence, especially the numbers that come after 20, which would be the end of May. It's also worth noting that unlike every other number, the 11s have a space inbetween the digits, ie. 1 1, which would imply that each number has its own unique stamp, rather than one stamp where the number can be increased each week. In addition, if they did represent the week of production, I would expect something to the denote the year as well.

Personally, I believe they somehow represent the factory they were produced in. Although, I have no way of verifying this, so I could be wrong. Did/does Nintendo even have 14 different production factories in Japan? If so, then why don't they just use the numbers 01-12 instead? There are still a lot of unanswered questions. But I would say the 1 1 stamp would help the argument that each factory had their own stamp.

Since we know that letters are added to the end of punch codes to signify ROM revisions, perhaps these codes may actually refer to the production of the ROM chips used, instead of the cart itself. Fingers crossed that all will be revealed in time.

If anyone comes across any punch code numbers I've not noted, or better yet, know what the numbers mean please let me know.
Edited by danilochka, Oct 29 2017, 01:41 PM.
Posted Image
Offline Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
Tyree_Cooper
Member Avatar
Established Member
Hey boss, thanks for the message. I'll be playing the devil's advocate, not because I don't think you're right, but to list out all my questions/doubts at once vis-a-vis the points you listed. Let me know what you think.

- The "00" is certainly an annoyance for both theories (week and factory). The 1st week would be "01", but so would the the 1st factory. Unless for some reason they decided to start at 0 instead of 1, which is not impossible at all. I've seen several companies counting from 0, as it adds one more possibility to the 1-digit progression (0 to 9 instead of 1 to 9). This is possibly the same reason why the 1st ROM version is not noted at all, and the 2nd version is noted as "A" and so on. For my own projects, I always start at V01, then V02 and so on, to avoid confusions internally and externally, but I understand why Nintendo can afford to have a slightly more obscure logic.

- Missing numbers don't necessarily kill the week theory, as it's very unlikely that games have been produced every week over a few years (the lifespan of the N64). I think production is usually planned for specific moments in the year, and this is a very important aspect of marketing (start of Summer holidays, just before Christmas, etc.) In fact, your table could give out some hints as to when games are produced the most: Week 8 (end-February), week 20 (mid-May) and week 34 (end-August). But it would require a much larger data set to draw good evidence.

- The larger spacing after "1" could be because this number is the narrowest, and if stamps are regular, then there is going to be more space on the right side of this number (unless they centre or align it on the right, but it seems to be aligned on the left).

- The missing year is a good point; in my company we do the same, and I got upset more than once because of this. They think the week number is good enough to identify the version of something to avoid confusion with other versions or reprints or minor changes/updates (coupled with a version number or some other code). The idea would be that XX is good enough to identify when the game was produced, as the year would be known beforehand or calculated by other means. And if the games is produced at the end of a year and steps over the next year? Then they will know the end of which year and the beginning of which year (since production would never span over a couple of weeks, at a very maximum, in fact 2 weeks should be well enough, even for large batches).

- Assuming the numbers are codes for factories, we'd have 41 factories. I don't think so. Even assuming they are not factory codes but machine codes, we'd have 41 machines, and I don't think they'd need to mention the machine code on the outer shell. In this case, I also wonder what machine it would be (the one making the mold, or the stickers, or the pcb?). Machine code still makes more sense than factory code, so maybe that's what it is. The number would identify the machine that produced the cart (or some parts of it), so that in case of a recall or issues found, they'd know which carts are affected.

- Yes, the code may be related to the ROM itself, but we know the ROM has its own production date printed on it, right? I'll open up a cart tonight to see if the shell has a date on it too, and I think the pcb has one too.
Offline Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
Tyree_Cooper
Member Avatar
Established Member
http://nintendoage.com/forum/messageview.cfm?catid=5&threadid=55602
http://nintendoage.com/forum/messageview.cfm?catid=5&threadid=157413

quote1
The two-digit number refers to the assembly plant at which it was manufactured. Most rarer games will only have one variant (or at most two) for that number, while more common games will have several such variants, I believe even as many as five or six. This may also tie somewhat into minor label variants, as well (like the TM vs. (R) variants, for example), as an upstart assembly plant could, in theory, be likely to use a newer version of a label than one who had already been ordered to produce the same game a few months earlier (and already had the older labels ready to go).

quote2
The numbers reflect the manufacturing center. For the SNES, I have found 21 different numbers (though the numbers themselves go anywhere from 00 to 44). The number 40 is a plant in Mexico, and the rest are presumably in Japan. Exactly where those plants are, I do not know. I have a thread about it here. [link not working]

Would be nice if they provided a source of some kind. I am still not convinced. Also, being produced once in a single plant doesn't mean it's rarer. If it was printed at 100k pieces, whereas another games has been produced three times in three different plants, but at 10k pieces each time, that's 30k pieces total. Meh.

And one more
http://forums.d2jsp.org/topic.php?t=70830322&f=34

quote3
I've heard of numbers on NES cartridges being batch numbers or production time periods or something of that nature.
Is it the same thing with gameboy games?
otherwise what do they mean or signifiy?

quote4
The two digit number which is stamped on indicates the factory in which is was produced Each factory has it's own number (and 90% of factories SFC-era onward are Nintendo owned, not licensed to a very close partner). If you are looking for a game/software revision look for the letter following the number (On FC they appear in the opposite corner to the number). But a better method would be to check out the number etched on the ROM IC following the game ID. [Number will be at 0 for V1.0, 1 for v1.1, etc]. Checking the ROM is more reliable as some people swap backs (problem when the number is on the rear). Cases is possible to be swapped, really rare, but it happens time to time for many reasons.
forgive the triple post :wub: :wub:

this one seems to know his stuff

https://gaming.stackexchange.com/questions/11400/nintendo-snes-n64-etc-cartridge-revisions

quote5
This number represents the facility/manufacturing line that the cartridge was assembled on. If your cartridge has the first version of the original ROM you will only see the 2-digit facility number. However, if a new version of the ROM was released from the developer to manufacturing, then a letter was appended to the end of the facility code.
Oh hey it's me again :yawn:

I think this post nails it
http://nintendoage.com/forum/messageview.cfm?catid=5&threadid=67141

""Nintendo produced the vast majority of carts even for 3rd party developers, so there's no surprise in the same number showing up on all those titles. Some 3rd parties did make their own carts, with Konami (or Ultra?) being the most prominent. Those carts have "24" printed on the back label rather than being stamped in. ""

so if those konami carts have a white code while other nintendo carts have the usual "punched in" code, I guess it can't be a date and must be a location/plant/machine code.
:yeah: :yeah: :yeah: :yeah: :yeah: :yeah:

now the additional question is, does the same code on different platforms mean the same plant, or can it be a different plant? but this is not a N64 question :n64:
Edited by Tyree_Cooper, Oct 30 2017, 02:27 AM.
Offline Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
danilochka
Member Avatar
Weigh My Fish
Hey man, thanks for adding those links to the discussion, hopefully I can address everything you've raised, plus add some things that I've discovered since posting yesterday.

Counting from zero is a standard practice in computing, and it is certainly something that can been seen elsewhere with Nintendo cart production. With any N64 game the original version of the ROM chip will end their code with -0 and start counting from there, meaning that Rev A games will have ROM chip code that ends with -1, Rev B is -2 and so on. So I have no problem accepting that these punch code numbers start at 00.

Missing numbers do provide a problem if we are to assume the digits represent the week of the year the cart was produced. It would seem that collectors who are documenting these things for other Nintendo systems have yet to come across a punch code higher than 44. Furthermore, if we go back to the Ocarina of Time example I linked to earlier, there are three known ROM variants of the North American release. With each of these variants, it is possible to access version info in a debug mode where you can get the following dates for when that ROM was compiled:

98-10-21 04:56:31 v1.0
98-10-26 10:58:45 v1.1 (Rev A)
98-11-12 18:17:03 v1.2 (Rev B)

This would imply that the original versions were manufactured for 5 days before the ROM chip was updated to Rev A. Although, not all factories (manufacturing plants) may have had immediate access to these new chips, so some originals may have continued to be produced for a short while after this date. The 21st October 1998 would be week number #41 when counting from zero, but then surely all original versions of the game should carry that punch code or higher. Going by what has been presented on Nintendo Age you can see that is not the case, granted the backs can get occasionally swapped out but many confirm that theirs is a launch day copy:

00 Gold x6
00 Grey x1
07 Gold x3
07 Grey x1
09 Gold x4
09 Grey x2
19 Gold x7
34 Grey x1
41 Gold x4
41 Grey x1

Note: I think we can both agree that these digits don't represent batch numbers. It seems very unlikely 42 batches of the original cart were made for North America, and as this is such a sort after variant there certainly wouldn't be as many missing numbers as there currently is.

It is my assumption that punch code numbers are used as an index to identify the manufacturing plant the cart came from, and the letters are added so that the ROM version can be known at a glance without having to open up the cart. The punch code will be useful for Nintendo employees if they happen to come across a defective game and tracking it down to see if the whole batch was affected.

Although I'm sure the process may have changed by the N64 era, there is an old video on YouTube which shows NES games being produced in the late 80s. If you look at the top of the screen at 06:51 there is a blue machine which me and No64dd believe is punching the code into the back of the carts before they get put into a dust sleeve, then bagged up and boxed.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yt4KG9ib8S4

I believe that each manufacturing plant was given their own identifying number, this is also the view of the SNES Central from quote2, who has gone further to try match where each of the 45 plants could be. I would really love to see that list but sadly it is no longer available on the site. This theory could help to explain why there are missing numbers, if some factories were focused soley on making Game Boy games or still producing SNES games, while others are just for other hardware like the consoles themselves.

This is why I mentioned the curious #11. Here's some pictures I took last night to showcase just how obvious the space between digits is when compared to the other codes. I just feel that there must be a reason why there's such a big gap, and I feel like it being the product of one particular factory might explain why none of the other numbers are like this:
https://i.imgur.com/4Y6bIQ5.jpg

It would appear that PAL and NTSC-U carts are stamped at different heights, make of that what you will. It is likely an adjustable factor in the pressing machine itself. It would be great to create a huge database to document which codes are present on each game but I don't think enough people care about the issue.
Edited by danilochka, Oct 30 2017, 06:47 AM.
Posted Image
Offline Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
Tyree_Cooper
Member Avatar
Established Member
Dani-boss, thanks again and I think they are all very valid points. The white codes of some Konami SFC/SNES are a massive hint in this direction, and so are the seemingly missing numbers, which make sense since not all plants may have been producing games (maybe some had closed too).

It would be fun to make a quick list of GB and SNES codes to see if they overlap N64 codes or not. I suppose long-term relationship plants might have done stuff for Nintendo for different platforms so it could be interesting.

Interesting theory about "11".

I'll throw another theory. One guy I quoted said 4X are plants in Mexico (sources would have been amazing...), if this is true, it could be that the 1st digit represents the country, while the second digit represents the actual plant according to Nintendo (probably numbered in a temporal manner, "X1" being the 1st plant and so on).

If this is true then Mexico being a late country where Nintendo made stuff (e.g. SNES reprints), it makes sense that it has the highest number in the list (4X). In this case, 1 is probably Japan, or maybe Japan is taking up 1/2 or even 1/2/3. I'm not sure they had plants elsewhere? At least for N64, I believe games are always made in Japan (and Mexico, if this is true?), while late accessories (and maybe parts of the machines) were made in China.

I don't want to waste anybody's time, it is a detail after all, but I like it. Many things have been said already, so I'm always on the hunt for stuff that hasn't been discussed a lot.
Edited by Tyree_Cooper, Oct 30 2017, 07:18 AM.
Offline Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
ItalianBaptist
Member Avatar
Senior Member
Not sure which version the revision was in but the later Pokemon Stadiums changed the color of Jynx's face from black to purple because of the controversy.
It must be exciting to never have played a Zelda game before - No64DD
Offline Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
jonathancutt
Newbie
The Cutting Room Floor - N64 Games

I use this website to look up debug info for games, and it does quite a good job of explaining the known differences between ROM revisions.

Eg. Banjo-Kazooie Rev. A not only fixes that termite mound shortcut (as Banjo starts slipping the moment he lands on a steep slope now) but it also fixes an exploit where you could erroneously break the rock blocking Gnawty's house in Spring instead of Summer in Click Clock Woods.

Not all games are listed, and not all differences between versions are known. But the site also uncovers hidden unused assets and what not in each game which is interesting.
Offline Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
Cabanon
Elite
wow, nice. didnt know such site existed. I think it should be worthy of the N64-Cyclopedia to add such thing.
Offline Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
jonathancutt
Newbie
ItalianBaptist
Oct 30 2017, 07:51 AM
Not sure which version the revision was in but the later Pokemon Stadiums changed the color of Jynx's face from black to purple because of the controversy.
From what I gather from a number of sources is that Pokemon Stadium revision A changes Jynx's face from black to purple, but introduces a glitch involving Chansey. Revision B was then made to address this Chansey freeze glitch (whilst retaining the purple Jynx change). Fairly sure this is the case.
Offline Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
« Previous Topic · Nintendo 64 Guides, FAQs, and Information · Next Topic »
Add Reply