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Use of display technology to produce the best possible image from the N64
Topic Started: Jan 27 2014, 05:43 PM (8,210 Views)
andyk2003
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Apologies for the double post!


I found a great new CRT display for the N64 :) This has a much larger tube size (29") but without some of the drawbacks that these size screens usually have when used with the N64.

It's one of the super-rare and much sought after (by retro gamers & arcade enthusiasts) line of NEC Pro Multisync CRT presentation monitors - the NEC XV-29 pro.

It's much harder to find than the Sony PVM or BVM monitors but has a shadow mask tube which are kinder to the N64s output as mentioned earlier. This is because the prominent scanlines of the equivalent sized apperture grille monitors (i.e. all the Sony monitors and a few others) break up the N64's image in a way that I personally don't like.

Unlike many other display types, this monitor stays razer sharp throughout it's life. As someone referencing high end gaming monitors on the Neo Geo forum put it:

"The PVM has better control over beam focus than the Mitsubishi Megaview Pro. The pro grade NEC Multisync slap them both down with ease and will retain its razor sharp focus til the death, due to being electro-magnetic focus instead of electro-static. "

Not only is this very sharp, the colours are very nice - bold but never over saturated, even at higher contrast levels. There is never too much colour bleed which is consistent with high end displays.

As with any TV/monitor over 21" (4:3), for a decent image an RGB mod is essential with this monitor. I've tried it with S-video and it looked horrible. RGB mods are simple and cheap to do & a no-brainer for an N64 enthusiast anyway. I'm guessing not very many people around here use composite as it's image quality is so poor.

There are some games that look better on the BVM than on the NEC due to it's small size and extreme quality (I've never seen Wave Race look good on a large screen), but for the first and second party 3D adventures & platformers that I love so much, playing on the bigger screen feels more 'epic' due to the large size. I love to feel that I'm 'absorbed' by the worlds Nintendo & Rare created & the NEC gives me that.

Anyway, there you have it - this monitor looks way better than my best Sony Trinitron TV, is 31Khz (480p) compatible for Gamecube games, has a beautiful sharp image and is a nice complement to the BVM. It's more akin to a high quality arcade screen and it's well worth picking one up - although they are rare.

I have the NEC and BVM permanently hooked up to my N64, SNES & Gamecube for the 2 very different experiences. It's very difficult to take decent photos of CRTs so I apologise for the bad quality. You can see that both are very bright & colourful & put out a ton of light. What can't be shown here is how pin sharp they are - really beautiful to look at in person...

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Close up of the shadow mask:

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You can see the 'interlocking' nature of the mask. The phosphors of a shadow mask display tend to be in a 'triad' formation which makes them so perfect for the N64. Conversely, the phosphors of an aperture grille are placed next to each other in straight lines which results in heavier 240p scanlines, especially on larger TVs & monitors.
Edited by andyk2003, Sep 28 2014, 05:06 AM.
My CRT thread:
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Kobeskillz
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rgb mod easy. Come on let's not forget that not everyone here knows this stuff. I wouldn't even know where to start plus I don't want to ruin my 64.

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andyk2003
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Totally understandable & fair point Kobeskillz :)

However there is a great solution to this. There will always be a decent modder in your country & it just takes a bit of research to find someone really good - we have Videogameperfection.com in the UK.

The beauty of the N64 mod is that it doesn't take long and the parts are cheap so as long as you have the right console revision (revision 4 or under for NTSC consoles), you should only expect to pay about 35 for the mod to be done by an expert. This is not a high price to pay, especially if you're going to be spending a lot of time playing your N64. The mod to ask for is the THS7314 amp mod which is the best currently available.

If your console is revision 5 or higher or any PAL console apart from an early French version, the mod is a little more expensive as you'll need the modder to fit the 'RGB for all' chip. In my opinion, it's still worth it if a relatively small one-off payment means having a high quality image for your N64 for many years to come.
My CRT thread:
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Kobeskillz
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andykara2003
Sep 12 2014, 02:53 PM
Totally understandable & fair point Kobeskillz :)

However there is a great solution to this. There will always be a decent modder in your country & it just takes a bit of research to find someone really good - we have Videogameperfection.com in the UK.

The beauty of the N64 mod is that it doesn't take long and the parts are cheap so as long as you have the right console revision (revision 4 or under for NTSC consoles), you should only expect to pay about 35 for the mod to be done by an expert. This is not a high price to pay, especially if you're going to be spending a lot of time playing your N64. The mod to ask for is the THS7314 amp mod which is the best currently available.

If your console is revision 5 or higher or any PAL console apart from an early French version, the mod is a little more expensive as you'll need the modder to fit the 'RGB for all' chip. In my opinion, it's still worth it if a relatively small one-off payment means having a high quality image for your N64 for many years to come.
Oh yeah if I can find a site or someone that does this i would def pay for it. As of now I don't know here in the states.

Anyone know?

I'll google it and see what I find but so far I've heard of the mod but haven't seen a site that does it for you.

Can you connect your 64 using component cables with this mod?

Sorry not to highjack your great thread.
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andyk2003
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No worries :)

Sorry, it slipped my mind that RGB scart isn't widely available in the US.

I haven't tried it before but to get component you'd need to use an RGB to component transcoder as the signals are too different to just modify a cable. This guy had success with a transcoder for his megadrive but the same would apply to the N64:

http://www.retro-otaku.com/2010/07/getting-component-video-out-of-a-sega-mega-drive-works-for-other-rgb-signals-as-well/

Also, Coligion from this forum uses one so it might be worth asking him about it - I would personally go for one that's as high quality as possible. A good transcoder won't add any lag.

The trouble is that a transcoder costs money - at least $50-$60 (or less on eBay if you're lucky.)

Another solution would be to get an inexpensive professional CRT monitor on eBay, say a Sony PVM of some kind, which will definitely accept RGB via BNC connectors.

Retro enthusiasts tend to go down the pro CRT monitor route in the US as they come up quite regularly on eBay and the TVs don't usually do RGB scart. If you get one, you'll end up with a very nice picture & they can go for as little as $40-$50 - but then you'd need RGB to BNC cables to connect the N64 to the monitor which would be another $30-ish & the cost starts mounting up. Personally I think it's worth it and only use monitors now as the image tends to be much better than the average TV, especially combined with the RGB mod.

The only caveat is that the larger PVMs (25" and above) have very prominent scanlines which I don't personally like when it comes to the N64 - but the 20" models look great if you don't mind a smaller screen. If you want a bigger screen it's best to go with a shadow mask monitor like the NEC.

For everyone in Europe and Australia it's easier as RGB scart TVs are much more common. In fact almost all CRT TVs that were sold here in the UK had it.

One thing to note, however, is that for lower quality displays or an old TV that has a soft image due to being at the end of it's life, the differences between s-video & RGB will be less apparent. In this case, an upgrade to a pro monitor would be a great move.

The Shmups forum would be a good place to ask around for good modders in the US - there's bound to be a few on there:

http://shmups.system11.org/index.php
Edited by andyk2003, Sep 13 2014, 06:32 AM.
My CRT thread:
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Kobeskillz
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andykara2003
Sep 12 2014, 05:28 PM
No worries :)

Sorry, it slipped my mind that RGB scart isn't widely available in the US.

I haven't tried it before but to get component you'd need to use an RGB to component transcoder as the signals are too different to just modify a cable. This guy had success with a transcoder for his megadrive but the same would apply to the N64:

http://www.retro-otaku.com/2010/07/getting-component-video-out-of-a-sega-mega-drive-works-for-other-rgb-signals-as-well/

Also, Coligion from this forum uses one so it might be worth asking him about it - I would personally go for one that's as high quality as possible. A good transcoder won't add any lag.

The trouble is that a transcoder costs money - at least $50-$60 (or less on eBay if you're lucky.)

Another solution would be to get an inexpensive professional CRT monitor on eBay, say a Sony PVM of some kind, which will definitely accept RGB via BNC connectors.

Retro enthusiasts tend to go down the pro CRT monitor route in the US as they come up quite regularly on eBay and the TVs don't usually do RGB scart. If you get one, you'll end up with a very nice picture & they can go for as little as $40-$50 - but then you'd need RGB to BNC cables to connect the N64 to the monitor which would be another $30-ish & the cost starts mounting up. Personally I think it's worth it and only use monitors now as the image tends to be much better than the average TV, especially combined with the RGB mod.

The only caveat is that the larger PVMs (25" and above) have very prominent scanlines which I don't personally like when it comes to the N64 - but the 20" models look great if you don't mind a smaller screen. If you want a bigger screen it's best to go with a shadow mask monitor like the NEC.

For everyone in Europe and Australia it's easier as RGB scart TVs are much more common. In fact almost all CRT TVs that were sold here in the UK had it.

One thing to note, however, is that for lower quality displays or an old TV that has a soft image due to being at the end of it's life, the differences between s-video & RGB will be less apparent. In this case, an upgrade to a pro monitor would be a great move.

The Shmups forum would be a good place to ask around for good modders in the US - there's bound to be a few on there:

http://shmups.system11.org/index.php
Thanks I'll look into it for sure. Right now I'm running monster s video on an crt wega Sony. Nothing fancy but looks nice especially compared to composite.

Though you spiked my interest. To bad scart is really rare here in the us. I never even heard of it until these forums for the n64 and snes.
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andyk2003
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Nice one :) There are a few people who have uploaded Youtube videos of their Sony PVM/BVM monitors that might be worth checking out. This is probably the most in depth one:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VdnC1mx7E0U

The BVM here is an older analogue version of mine. It's telling that it still looks amazing even though it was made in 1987. If you can find a later BVM (made around 2000) with less than 20,000 hours on it, it will probably outlast us all & still look perfect - they are that well made.


Another video showing someone from the US with an RGB modded N64 on a Sony PVM monitor:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bAGf-Hcl9pU

These are both 20 inch monitors that look great with the N64 - the NEC is the only large monitor I've found that I've been happy with though.


Here's some more info on the BVM monitors and others - the BVM showcased here is the one I have:

http://shmups.system11.org/viewtopic.php?f=6&t=43256



One thing I've been pondering recently regarding this, though, is that by going into all this here I really don't want to make people unsatisfied with the setups they have already.

To be honest, all this is just for obsessive types like me who want to get the absolute best image. I'm sure your setup looks great anyway Kobeskillz - the Sony TVs are fantastic and as you say, s-video is much better than composite.

My mission to get a great N64 image has been fun & satisfying and I now have an amazing setup - but it's been very time consuming - and I've found it has sometimes detracted a little from just enjoying the games for what they are and I feel ready to let it go now & just enjoy playing my N64.

I'm glad I've shared my findings here though & I hope it helps people - but I also think there's also something to be said for not getting too bogged down in all this and just enjoying what you have. It's all about the games after all :)
Edited by andyk2003, Sep 14 2014, 03:24 AM.
My CRT thread:
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Kobeskillz
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andykara2003
Sep 14 2014, 01:21 AM
Nice one :) There are a few people who have uploaded Youtube videos of their Sony PVM/BVM monitors that might be worth checking out. This is probably the most in depth one:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VdnC1mx7E0U

The BVM here is an older analogue version of mine. It's telling that it still looks amazing even though it was made in 1987. If you can find a later BVM (made around 2000) with less than 20,000 hours on it, it will probably outlast us all & still look perfect - they are that well made.


Another video showing someone from the US with an RGB modded N64 on a Sony PVM monitor:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bAGf-Hcl9pU

These are both 20 inch monitors that look great with the N64 - the NEC is the only large monitor I've found that I've been happy with though.


Here's some more info on the BVM monitors and others - the BVM showcased here is the one I have:

http://shmups.system11.org/viewtopic.php?f=6&t=43256



One thing I've been pondering recently regarding this, though, is that by going into all this here I really don't want to make people unsatisfied with the setups they have already.

To be honest, all this is just for obsessive types like me who want to get the absolute best image. I'm sure your setup looks great anyway Kobeskillz - the Sony TVs are fantastic and as you say, s-video is much better than composite.

My mission to get a great N64 image has been fun & satisfying and I now have an amazing setup - but it's been very time consuming - and I've found it has sometimes detracted a little from just enjoying the games for what they are and I feel ready to let it go now & just enjoy playing my N64.

I'm glad I've shared my findings here though & I hope it helps people - but I also think there's also something to be said for not getting too bogged down in all this and just enjoying what you have. It's all about the games after all :)
Completely understand. If I had money and more time I would be just like you. Alas I'm lucky if I even have time to play. Darn kids.
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andyk2003
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Hi guys - it's been a while since I last posted and the dust has settled a bit so I thought I'd update...

I've now tested and owned a lot of high end TVs & monitors and had come to the conclusion that my BVM-20E1E and NEC XV29+ were the best monitors for the NTSC N64. They are indeed very good monitors - however, having spent some time with them, I've wavered on this & now use a different display.

The reason is that these monitors are, in a way, TOO good for the N64's output because they are so sharp, they highlight the flaws in the N64's image, resulting in a pixelly mess at times (ocarina of time particularly). They also have very strong scanlines (not so great for 3D 240p stuff). On the other end of the spectrum, a well-used CRT with a softened image won't have such a visible mask but will also be blurry, which is not for me.

With my 25" and above consumer CRTs (which are low use & still very sharp), these problems are also apparent, but on my (very low hours) 21" 50/60Hz consumer Trinitron (KV-21X5U) the scanlines are virtually gone, the sharpness remains yet the aperture grille is very mellow and actually enhances the image rather than detracts from it. At this smaller TV size, the grille/mask and pixel density is now high enough to properly support the low resolution of the N64.

So there it is; I've tested some of the best retro gaming CRT TVs & monitors around but have come to the conclusion that, personally, a little-used 21" 4:3 50/60Hz, 15Khz (pre-EDTV) consumer Trinitron (or high end 21" shadow mask like the Loewe E3000/E3001 chasis) gives the best image for the N64 - it's really made playing my N64 even more of a pleasure :). This display gives the *perfect* balance of sharpness, subtle scanlines and the gentle CRT 'anti-alias' effect to do the N64's image credit.

The scanlines/shadow mask of the 21" blends in and stops being distracting at about 2.5 feet from the screen. The 25" equivalent would have to be about 5 feet away for this to happen - so even though the 21" is the smaller TV, it still takes up a much larger portion of your field of view when you sit at the ideal distance. The 25" does look good at 5 feet - but I much prefer to sit closer to game so as to be more 'involved' in the gameworld.

People say that in retrospect, the N64's looks worse now than we remember it to be back in the day - the 21" Sony is the only display that, to me, makes the N64 look as good as I remember it to be when I first played it. An RGB mod is still necessarily to get this super clean look. S-video isn't so much worse but the N64 needs as much signal clarity as it can get and using RGB definitely results in a cleaner image.

For the image to be really good, there are a couple of caveats: firstly, the TV needs to be from a really good manufacturer. Just getting a 50Hz/60Hz Sony is a good way to guarantee that - shadow mask (non-Sony) TVs are quite variable in quality. Secondly, the TV has to have had relatively little use in it's lifetime. The trick is to find one that has only been rarely used as it's spent it's life, say, in a guest room or a holiday home. I can't stress enough how much a difference this makes - the image is so much sharper than a well-used TV's. Technical aspects like convergence, focus, geometry etc. tend to still be in good order as well.

I should mention that I've based all of this on NTSC games as I don't play PAL stuff generally - however for people that do, many PAL N64 games look fine on a decent 25" CRT due to the increased resolution - a little blurrier than an NTSC game on a 21" CRT but without the strong scanlines/shadowmask effect produced by an NTSC N64 on a 25" CRT. RGB and a low use CRT are still essential for the best picture. Also, some select NTSC games can still look OK on a 25" from a certain distance (4-5 feet). They tend to be games that have a certain 'clean cut' look like Mario 64 & Mario Kart 64. I might use my 25" CRTs, say, when playing multiplayer MK64 with friends - where people are usually a little further from the screen. On the other end of the spectrum, NTSC Ocarina of time looks awful on anything over 21" due in part to having to portray a natural envirnoment.

Luckily, 21" TVs are the most likely to have been used as secondary TVs as the main living room TV's were usually a size or two bigger. I tend to ask eBay sellers how the TV's been used. A good way to double check this is by looking at the remote - if it's the original remote, looks mint & the numbers haven't been worn away in the slightest then the TV probably hasn't had too much use.

There it is - the end of an obsession. I hope all this is useful to someone :)
Edited by andyk2003, Jan 4 2015, 03:15 PM.
My CRT thread:
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kartmaster
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Come on now Andy... a quest like this never really ends does it? Hehe.

I for one appreciate all your impressions.

One thing I've seriously thought about is investing in some TV repair equipment and tapping some knowledge from my engineer friends. Just enough to keep these CRTs in as good of shape as possible in the decades to come. At some point these displays will truly be antiques. And the people that know how to service them are already disappearing.
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andyk2003
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Thanks Kartmaster :) I know what you mean, learning CRT maintenance/repair might be a good idea - I still want to be able to play N64 on a decent CRT when I'm old!
My CRT thread:
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Grizzmeister
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From being left in my cold bonus room for so long, I think my 20 inch Toshiba flat-screen CRT is starting to hum when I use it to play video games. :( I noticed it recently when I connected my original Wii to it so I could see how Project M played interlaced and in the retro 4.3 aspect ratio. It's possible that the TV hummed a little all along and I'm only noticing it now because I've spent so much time on my freakishly quiet LCD TV, though. :eh:
"All truth passes through three stages. First, it is ridiculed. Second, it is violently opposed. Third, it is accepted as being self-evident." - Arthur Schopenhauer

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andyk2003
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Sorry to hear that.. I looked into long term CRT storage a while back & apparently large variations in temperature isn't good as it causes the components/solder to expand & shrink which causes them to deteriorate. Also dampness is a problem & the humidity would ideally be at around 50% (ish.)

I forgot to mention a tip I learned - people tend to have the contrast on their CRTs set much too high - this burns out the phosphors more quickly & shortens the life of the CRT. With a well-used TV, the contrast will probably need to be set high just to get a normal image but on a low-use/new CRT, the image will be quite vibrant at flat brightness & contrast settings.

I like a really vibrant image for gaming & I do set the contrast just a notch above centre (& brightness at centre position), but no more than that. The best way to increase the vibrancy while preserving the CRT's phosphors is to reduce the ambient light rather than turn up the brightness/contrast - by closing the curtains/turning off any lighting etc. - or for an image that really leaps off the screen, playing the dark :)

Edited by andyk2003, Jan 7 2015, 11:28 AM.
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andyk2003
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Very last addition - I finally settled on the Loewe E3001 chassis 25" (63cm) TV for my N64. It's shadow mask produces an incredibly sharp, vibrant image - but the difference to the similarly sized Sony consumer CRTs and the professional monitors is that the scanlines are much mellower, producing a smoother image - but at the same time retaining the sharpness and clarity. Very prominent scanlines can look good for 2D 240p consoles, but just look wrong on the N64's image (in my opinion.) These Loewes really are awesome - some of the best 15Khz TVs ever made - but like any CRT, they need to be relatively low use if they are to be sharp - maybe just used as a bedroom or guestroom TV. The picture is breathtaking.

I eventually found the 21" Sony a little small for my N64 gaming - also the mellow but slightly more prominent (being 25") scanlines of the Loewe actually provide a kind of subtle sharpening to the image that I prefer. The ideal viewing distance is about 4 feet from the Loewe. Any closer and the shadow mask gets too obvious (as with any 25" TV). The Loewe's also great with the ealier consoles. The rare 1-chip (sharper) SNES looks just amazing on it.

In the meantime, I found some incredible progressive scan 31Khz (480p) CRTs for the Gamecube era consoles that even make the Wii look stunning. They have VGA inputs that will run a 31Khz image with no processing and look mind blowing. One is the 29" Metz 605G chassis 2005 CRT (Once of the best 4:3 CRTs ever made, but 100Hz so not good for the N64) and the 29" NEC XV29 plus mentioned earlier (just as good for Gamecube etc. but again, very heavily scanlined with the N64). For widescreen, the Loewe Aconda with VGA card and high end Sony XBR TVs are also fantastic.

Happy gaming! :)
Edited by andyk2003, Apr 23 2015, 02:48 PM.
My CRT thread:
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TomKStones
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I'm still using a CRT with RF; only way to go. :D
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Grimakis
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TomKStones
Apr 24 2015, 04:13 AM
I'm still using a CRT with RF; only way to go. :D
Why would you use RF lol?
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Cabanon
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I never even used RF for NES. you must be desperate or have a really really really old TV to use that, ha !
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Grimakis
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Cabanon
Apr 24 2015, 12:47 PM
I never even used RF for NES. you must be desperate or have a really really really old TV to use that, ha !
I used to play my consoles even up to Gamecube over RF. My little 14" TV only had a Coax input haha. However I would never go back.

Regards,
George
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andyk2003
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With all this talk of RF, I got curious & ordered an official RF adapter, just for a laugh really - and to see how so many people were playing N64 back in the day. I upgraded to RGB (NTSC) when the N64 was not long out, but I think my very first N64 must have run RF (there were no composite cables in the UK box) and I thought it looked awesome :)

Anyway, I like the thought of having that little that piece of N64 history in my collection, even though I'll never use it for actual gameplay purposes. I'll get back here with my findings... I would imagine it looks pretty terrible next to a decent RGB mod!
My CRT thread:
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kartmaster
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I use RF on my NES to this day. It doesn't look too terrible on my Sony. I think the set has a lot to do with it and you want to make sure you don't coil the extra cable as then you've just created an RF antenna that can potentially soak up interference.
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andyk2003
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Cool. Is that a large or smaller Sony? Using a 21/22" or smaller set will look better with a low quality signal than a bigger one. The NES is one of the hardest consoles to get a pure RGB signal from.

A very talented guy called Viletim (also did the N64 DAC mentioned earlier) came out with the solution recently, but it's a pretty complicated install. It looks amazing apparently.
My CRT thread:
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Cabanon
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I know someone is working on neshdmi over at nintendoage. no clue where the project is now but the image were stunning.
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andyk2003
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Yes, I've seen it - that project's looking really good- Kevtris is the guy working on it, I think. So we'll have the options of an HDMI N64 and an HDMI NES, which is awesome for those who don't want a CRT in the house.

The HDMI NES kit uses the NES' own PPU so is pretty authentic and has no lag at all - and both mods will be a huge jump up from using composite on an HDTV. For a lot of people the results will be great - but I have to admit that I'm not really so keen on the type of image that these flat panel mods and scalers produce..

It depends what kind of image you like - if you like your pixels to be very defined and razor sharp, this will be great. The result is an almost clinical looking image - but also quite blocky, especially without introducing scanlines. Luckily - like the XRGB mini - the NES mod has a scanline option in an attempt to mimic a CRT and reduce the blockiness.

But for me, there are a few other aspects that make these games look so good on a (decent) CRT and add up to form the reason why CRTs give that perfect 'anti alias' effect for 240p. These are colour bleed (but not too much), the shadow mask/aperture grille (very important), brightness haloing and the non-linear brightness curve.

All of these combine to form a kind of 'texture' that really complements low-res graphical output and are hard to recreate in hardware at the moment. The basic scanline generators in these mods & the XRGB scalers are the current solution to this, but are relatively crude - all they do is overlay alternate horizontal lines of (ideally variable) density over the image to simulate an aperture grille CRT.

The real aperture grille or shadow mask is much more complex than that in it's makeup, though, & a shadow mask (best for N64) would need at least a 4K TV to approximate well. We're really in the early generations of hardware CRT emulation at the moment & things will be much better in the future, with all aspects of the image being customisable. Even then, though, I wouldn't want to play on a 16:9 screen. The options are to either have the 4:3 image stretched to 16:9 or to have big black borders either side - none of which are attractive to me, although I know lots of people are fine with this.

The real strides that have been taken in this area are in emulation - there are some amazing shaders around that go much further towards producing a CRT-like image especially for 2D games, although people usually overdo the effect. Real hardware just appeals to me more though - Ocarina of time just feels much more epic on a real N64. Funnily enough, from what I've seen the one console that no shader has managed to get right is the elusive N64 .

It obviously goes without saying that this is all just my opinion. A lot of people will be loving these new mods as well as their XRGBs & that's great. It's only the obsessive types who are searching for the absolute best 240p image possible that will care about any of this :)
Edited by andyk2003, May 3 2015, 07:51 AM.
My CRT thread:
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andyk2003
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My god this guy (Marshall) has done it! He's surpassed any existing hardware scaling option available for the N64, including the XRGB mini. Many of us have been waiting for a long time for this but the wait has been worth it. The options in this mod are fantastic. If you like the CRT look, he's actually managed to successfully emulate colour bleed, non-linear brightness curve etc. along with added scanlines and it looks great. The emulation is of the aperture grille rather than shadow mask style CRT.

If you like sharp pixels with no scanlines (not my bag), there's even a de-blur option that applies algorithms to the image to reverse Nintendo's blur filter - all this within one frame (16ms) of lag. I don't think this will ever replace my CRTs for various reasons, but I'm getting one anyway just for fun. If you use a flat panel for N64 gaming, I wouldn't hesitate in buying this.

The release in imminent - check out this review and also this video on Marshall's site...
Edited by andyk2003, Oct 27 2015, 05:38 PM.
My CRT thread:
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Vinyl
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I have seen it and this guy deserves who made this deserves a medal

the screens are amazing and it's hard to believe this came from a console to a modern tv!

If you have this HDMI mod, and a Region Free console. that is the holy grail right there.
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andyk2003
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Absolutely.. although I forgot to mention that I asked him about PAL yesterday and says that although PAL consoles will work with the mod, unfortunately as many PAL titles are ports that have 240p images stretched to 288p, they will look pretty rough - so with this particular mod, NTSC remains the superior option....
Edited by andyk2003, Oct 28 2015, 05:37 AM.
My CRT thread:
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Grimakis
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Yes the N64 HDMI looks really cool.
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andyk2003
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The one caveat is that this won't be cheap. So far, the info is that Marshall is only shipping the mods to specific resellers/installers who will have to order 5+ kits at $127 each. The mod will be fairly complicated to install, so unless you're really good with a soldering iron, the cost of the installation and the reseller's margin will probably increase the cost by a fair amount. He's planning on announcing more info by Nov 1st.

Personally I think that the price seems reasonable, especially considering the amount of time he's put into it, the quality of the mod and the limited market...

My CRT thread:
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andyk2003
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So here's the first installer/reseller I've seen for this mod. You have to send an N64 to them - then they'll perform the mod for $164 plus shipping charges.

I'm fine with that but I'd be really interested to hear what people here think about the price - is it putting anyone off buying this?
My CRT thread:
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buddy1983
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Does that price include the kit needed? Whats the price of the mod on its own?
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