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From Aug 2006 - Nov 2013 WeDig provided a live forum for diggers & fans of Vindolanda. It has now been mothballed and will be maintained as a live archive.

Here you will find preserved 7 years of conversation, photos, & knowledge about a site many people love. Vindolanda gets under the skin. (Figuratively and literally as a volunteer excavator!) It's a place you remember, filled with people you remember!

Thanks for 7 great years!

Thoughts from 2007 season
This year's excavation season sure had its ups and downs, its dry spells and floods. But most importantly it had a lot of great people volunteering to get muddy and dirty all in the name of knowledge. I had a great time and many of the pictures put up on this website show most other volunteers enjoying themselves no matter the weather! I hope to be back next year for a few weeks and see what it is like to dig on the inner side of a fort wall. I pose a question to the archaeologists and volunteers- What did the 2007 season do for you? For me it was a chance to get back into archaeology and help lead into my present job. It rekindled my love of history as a puzzle when you can sit with a bunch of people drink some beers and talk about what all those artifacts or ditches or postholes mean. Most of you volunteers are not archaeologists for a living though so I am wondering what it is that gets you out of your cozy home and into the rain and sun and muck. And did the '07 season live up to expectations? It may be kinda strange for a question (or two I guess) but it is interesting to read about the experiences that we all have had.
Matt


Roman Wells?
An interesting discovery Bryan. I wonder if the well-like structure was used for storing grain instead of water. I have read that some cultures would store grain in the ground for the winter. Some of the grain would go bad, I guess rot, but the majority would be protected by the outter layer of "bad" grain and be useable at some later date. Any grains or seed found in the "well"?
Matt

Pictures!!!
Duncan:
The pottery is Native American spanning a period from 500-700 AD. Some of it is desorated which helps those higher up work out the actual timeline. Yes I am just another human JCB at this job, too! Shell tools are turning up that have been brought from the Gulf coast which is about six miles from the area. The shells are turned into hammers, and drinking vessels, and even awls. But others like oyster and clam are discarded food shell. The finds keep me going in the hundred degree heat on black sandy soil. Some days I think I am going to melt away! No Spanish artefacts as far south as I am on the Gulf coast of Florida.
Matt

Pictures!!!
Great pictures you all. I guess I picked right this year by "doing my time" at the beginning of the season when it was beautiful and dry (mostly). I can't believe that shortly there will be no more digging until next year. The update posts have been great fun to read. Thanks again everyone.

Bryan: I am now working as an archaeologist for a company doing work in my hometown area of southwest Florida. Yes, 100 degree humid, mosquito infested days of shovel testing sand and muck. There has been some joy though as pottery has turned up along with bone. No stone structures or a fort wall to contend with where I am!
Matt