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From Aug 2006 - Nov 2013 WeDig provided a live forum for diggers & fans of Vindolanda. It has now been mothballed and will be maintained as a live archive.

Here you will find preserved 7 years of conversation, photos, & knowledge about a site many people love. Vindolanda gets under the skin. (Figuratively and literally as a volunteer excavator!) It's a place you remember, filled with people you remember!

Thanks for 7 great years!

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Area B Team Photos 2010
Justin
I think I speak for all of the volunteer community when I say how very much I am looking forward to seeing you incorporate this latest find into your talk to school groups!
Tim Wolter

Dig blog on blogger, May 23-27
Great stuff on the blog!

I sent you a suggestion via email ....check inbox top of page if it does not route to you some other way.

T.Wolter

Dig blog on blogger, May 23-27
good stuff J.
keep moving that turf. Don't make the usual Yank mistake of calling it sod!

T Wolter

Mike's Geoblog
Great stuff, Mike. I was wondering if "mudstone" was anything like an official designation. Looking forward to the "coinstone" data.
T.Wolter

Area B blog, late April 2010
Area B "blog" updated with a few pix.
And yes Helen you were correct in your description of how spindle whorls are used.
Its never a good day unless you learn something.

T Wolter

Close.....but not quite.
This is my favorite.

Look over the picture first, create a mental image of what you are seeing, then come back to read the correct (per Andrew) answer.




Sure looks like the handle to something. Lamp? Early Gillette Track II razor?

Nope. Its a naturally formed item. There is a very soft stone called mudstone found on site, and when washed by water it can form into some very convincing pseudo artifact shapes.

Andrew refers to this as a "Mudstone Willy", which would be a damned good name for a Blues musician.

I encountered one last year that was perfectly square and and projected up from a section of Site B cobbles.

Mudstone is very fragile, nobody would use it to make household articles. The "Willy" seen above broke when somebody set it down roughly the next day.


T.Wolter

Close.....but not quite.
Here are a couple of sestertii.
Oh, I guess not.
Sometimes stones can be just the right size and shape, and in the dim light of the trench, even appear to have the right color for a fine patina. And with the degree of wear common on well circulated roman small change, the relative lack of surface detail is not a deal breaker. Remember, we are not supposed to wipe them vigorously on our sleeves to read the Emperors!
The second image is a bit of a cheat, it actually is felt to be an artifact. A stone gaming counter from the post roman end of the site. I guess by then they had descended from metal, bone and ivory counters, had run out of decent pottery shards from which to make their poker chips, and were gambling with hunks of rounded off rock.
TJW

Close.....but not quite.
When wet this had exactly the color of nicely preserved bronze. Perhaps a well worn amulet? The clue was that there was no surrounding oxide in the soil.

TJW

Close.....but not quite.
Archeology on a site like Vindolanda depends heavily on sharp eyes. You have to constantly be scanning the soil for anything that is not quite right in terms of shape, size and color.
Of course, when you are looking that intently, you will sometimes start to see things that are "almost" artifacts. Certain soil conditions, or perhaps even a long stretch on minimal finds, can bring on actual hallucinations!
To help train in the eyes, I am posting a few pics of things that briefly caught my eye in late April and early May. Feel free to add your own as the season progresses.
This is a particularly challenging thing to photograph, as the factors which make them foolers can be subtle. Whether things are wet or dry, whether there is soil stain from surrounding iron pan, etc.
Enjoy, and please add your own contributions as the dig season moves along.

T.Wolter

Area A. April / May 2010
Worn stones? Here's the sandal level view.
I should note that some of these pictures are courtesy of Brinno, who has a good camera and knows how to use it.
Guess the thread should be renamed April/May 2010

T Wolter

Area A. April / May 2010
The Roadies

TJW

Area A. April / May 2010
Detail of the east side of the road, as we again look from north to south. There was tumble from a barracks wall collapse, but also some massive stones mixed in as part of a post roman foundation. Evidence of post supports was also seen
TJW

Area A. April / May 2010
Day five again, this time standing at about our starting point and looking north.

TJW

Area A. April / May 2010
Contrast with our day five shot!

The "sofa" is at about the level of the digger seen outside the fence.
This is taken looking from north to south. As we got further north the road surface was more intact.

TJW

Area A. April / May 2010
Continuing Michael's series of Area A views, mostly of the North South road from the north gate to the headquarters.

Here is where we started our first day. Note the color change in the rubble, we have taken off the first square of turf. The raised slab with the finds bag on top (we called it "the sofa") is a handy landmark.

Looking east

T.Wolter

"Area A" Team Photos 2010
Week five crew for Area A.
A few extras who had been volcano-stranded the previous week!
T.Wolter

A virtual walk around Pompeii
Justin

Much as I like the Twice Brewed, their non wireless computers (there are two of them) are pretty much worthless for anything other than email and checking up on world news. Almost anything that allows postings, like WeDig, is blocked. I was able to check stock market information, not that I enjoyed that much last week!
If you had things to post to WeDig, Harry or I could relay them. Probably not pictures though, in addition to the blocking issue the computers are very slow. I guess if Brian from Twicey was investing in wireless that upgrading the legacy systems would not be a high priority.
I assume the Wireless system is much superior.
Wireless also said to be available at the OnceBrewed hostel.

Tim Wolter

A virtual walk around Pompeii
Stateside, safe and sound.
Iceland volcano still erupting, we got a good look at it on our flight home.
Huge dark thunderheads up to 15,000 feet, with a faint orange glow at the base.
Creepy.
Hope nobody else has their travel complicated.

Pix of our recent stay in a few days when I adjust to the Western Hemisphere.

T Wolter