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Stanegate
Topic Started: Dec 24 2006, 02:13 PM (1,243 Views)
Andy
Dr Andrew Robin Birley
[ *  * ]
Matt,

You don't have a spare couple of million do you? Harry might offer something here, but I am not sure if I can afford the payments!

:rolleyes:

Andy
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SacoHarry
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I'll check the till, or the jar of petty cash. I'm sure something could be arranged!

If only the Trust would take up my Adopt-a-Shoe proposition, you guys would be rolling in it!

Matt, you're coming up with some fantastic questions. Where are you finding about the tumuli, camps, etc.? Is it the Ordnance Survey maps online, Vindolanda reports, or something else fancy up your sleeve? I love those OS maps. I just realized that the cottage I stayed at this past summer ran very close to a Roman aqueduct system. Next time I'm over I'll spend an evening doing a little hunt for esoteric ruins.

- Harry
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MBetz
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Harry-
I love maps and have the OS OL 43 Explorer map. On it are plenty of earthworks like camps and tumuli, and weirdly named features like the "mare and foal". I have the "Roman Camps in England" book by RCHME and it is quite good for explaining the basic layout of camps. So few have been archaeologically tested. Seatsides, the camp west of Vindolanda on the stanegate, is one of those many that has not been excavated to my knowledge. It is unfortunate that metal detector testing is not allowed on scheduled sites. To me, detectors are another tool for understanding the make up of an area (hate the word "site", too many definitions by archaeologists for that word). The detectorists do not need to dig the "hit" but recording the type of metal, how far into the earth and location can be helpful in seeing any patterns that might explain what went on previously in the detectored area. GPS plotting of the detector hits along with the basic data seems very helpful, and no actual digging would have been done. Maybe for this next five year plan for the Hadrian's Wall heritage zone, more test excavation in selected camps can be done to help put the camps around Vindolanda in a context that would explain the development of the central location on the stanegate route.

Andy- What was your dissertation on for your Master's? Justin must be sweating a decision for his. I think he has to have one shortly. Justin, do you have one yet? I'm just finishing module one so I have some time.

Does the Vindolanda Trust purchase the Archaeologia Aeliana (sp?)? I can not access it from online and I know a great amount of reports have been published in that journal for Northumberland and Hadrian's Wall. That would be a great couple of days just sitting and reading all the back issues. I am such a goober!
Matt
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SacoHarry
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Rock on Senor Goober. Sounds like a brilliant publication. I just Googled it, and came across the Society of Antiquaries in of Newcastle-upon-Tyne Web site: http://www.newcastle-antiquaries.org.uk/. They have the TOCs for a couple of the latest volumes. Great stuff!

Interestingly, they also note that Bruce's old "Handbook to the Roman Wall" has actually been updated & revised again. It's now the 14th edition, published 2006, ISBN-13: 978-0-901082-65-7; ISBN-10: 0-901082-65-1. I think I'm definitely going to pick up a copy. It'd be interesting to see all that's changed since the 1960s.

You've got a great idea re using metal detectors more for geophys than excavation. Hard to see anyone having a problem with that! Then again, the vagaries of the Scheduled Monuments laws are beyond a Yank like me.

- Harry
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Andy
Dr Andrew Robin Birley
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Matt,

I skipped the MA and went right to the PhD.

Andy
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Mr Twicey
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Did someone mention wheelbarrows?
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Andy
Dr Andrew Robin Birley
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The wheelbarrow,

This years must have accessory for the excavations. Those best dressed sport a little French number called the Hamerlin. Long handled with a good suspension, the Hamerlin is the barrow of choice for all those who care how they look while knackered. Of course, if you’re a chav you may opt for the English equivalent. They look good enough at first but after a few days the rust sets in, the wheel deflates and the nuts drop off.

:unsure:
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SacoHarry
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But they look fabulous with chrome rims, tinted windscreen, & neon underlighting.
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MBetz
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Harry is of course explaining the latest U.S. model of wheelbarrow. But he forgot the most important item, the stereo. I would think 8" bass speakers, mounted on the arms of the wheelbarrow blasting the latest by Jay-Z, Fifty cent or maybe some new hip-hop queen. Now that wheelbarrow is stylin! Peace, Love, and Dirt
I'm out!
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Mr Twicey
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I do have a small spoiler which could possibly be attached to the UK model. This would aid in uniform air distribution across the 'barrow, helping maintain the load in a central location. It would also allow for greater speed across uneven ground by applying greater downward force at the higher wheelbarrow speeds. this would prevent spillage and speed up the extrudate extraction process. :huh: Of course it would also make the driver look very cool. B)

Can i also suggest a, one size too large for head, baseball cap. This must be placed on the head with the peak facing to the front. The Peak is then rotated 16 degrees to the right. After completion of said rotation, visor must then be pulled to a downward angle that impedes vison to a "significant level". You would then be Chav Kool- innit. :D
Applicable clothing and other accessories include tracksuit bottoms (tucked into socks), gold jewllery, fluffy dice hanging off the 'barrow and a possible sports passenger seat for your heavily preggers girlfriend/sister/mother. :blink:

(there is no legal requirment for a chav to take due care when carrying passengers in a 'barrow) ;)
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MBetz
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I would say that you are describing the ex-Mr. Britney Spears!
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MBetz
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While digging this season I had a chance to visit Roman Corbridge and see the Stanegate. Quite impressive. Would it have been as impressive outside of the towns and near any forts or way stations. I have been on roads that go from one town to another with nothing between and they seem to be the least maintained stretches. I wonder if it was similar during Roman times. Out of sight out of mind ya know for repairs and the like.
Matt
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SacoHarry
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Just ask Octavius, the guy from one of the tablets writing that he was delayed because he didn't want to risk injuring his animals on the bad roads.

I've always loved that one. What's the one thing all the archaeology shows drill into your head about the Romans? Their amazing roads. What's one of the first things that Robin & crew pull up from the gloop? A letter complaining about the cruddy roads. Priceless!

- Harry
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MBetz
Member
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Harry,
While at Corbridge I was thinking of that particular letter that bemoans the fact that the road is in such horrid repair. Of course if I lived in the big town and owned a business I wouldn't be out in the country much and might not know that the roads were quagmires and full of pot holes. The town roads would be in good repair and show off the "might" of Rome. Awe the locals and all.
Matt
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