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This is the End, My Friend...; All about the Fourth Century and Beyond
Topic Started: May 15 2009, 11:01 AM (261 Views)
SacoHarry
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Heya Eric! I could try taking a starter whack at this for you. Some of it came into play when I was putting the period pieces together for the Digger's Guide. Something was definitely happening at Vindolanda in the 4th C. I think numberwise it's still fuzzy, but kinda striking.

There seem to be two known phases to it. First, in the early 4th C (Period VIII), almost all life ended outside the fort. A few cemeteries were used, maybe a storehouse here, furnace there. But there were no more civilians living outside the walls. Yet evidence inside the fort is strong for lots of civilian, domestic-type stuff continuing -- goods being traded, domestic stuff being made, new houses being built, etc. So in the 3rd C you had maybe 500 troops in the fort, and maybe that number again living outside. In the 4th C, the entire population of Vindolanda was inside the walls. It's not conclusive, but the hunch is that there were fewer soldiers, and more open space available for the civilians.

In addition, by early-to-mid 4th C both of the southern latrines had been demolished. So the original 4 public toilets were down to 2. Now again, maybe folks were doubling up in the remaining 2, maybe there were new cesspit-type toilets that haven't been found yet. But the impression is that there were just plain way fewer people living there, needing fewer facilities.

When you get later, after the big "Barbarian Conspiracy" of 367, there is a radical shift in construction within the fort, Period IX. It's become pretty clear that the 4th Gauls weren't there anymore. The new folks were hardy, and built/repaired a -lot- of stuff onsite, but their work is almost always slipshod. Really lousy. And it tends to break pretty much every rule known about how Roman forts were organized. This doesn't speak to #s of people as much as it does to quality. It's almost certain that this was a troop of "limitanei," without anywhere near as much training, discipline, money, etc. as the old cohort. And probably without much left in terms of "Romanitas" -- if that word still meant anything by then.

Anyway, that's what I've gleaned. I'd love to learn more about it myself. That whole end-of-the-story thing really does get me.
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SacoHarry
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Neat new Web site gearing up to commemorate the 1600th anniversary of the end of Roman rule next year, called http://www.410.org.uk/. (Hat-tip to Andy, thx!) I haven't spent too much time there yet. But it looks to touch on a lot of this -- what happened to the locals when Roman rule ended, the archaeology that's come up, current digs that are focused on the "end of the story" etc. Looks like a pretty neat site. I'm psyched to check it out!
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