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Rugby League Team Of The 60's; 1960-1969
Topic Started: Nov 9 2006, 01:09 AM (3,222 Views)
galahs
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Team of the Decade Nominees (1960s)




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Fullbacks
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Graeme Langlands

A post war Rugby League immortal, words do little to justify the impact Langlands had on the game during the sixties and seventies. The greatest point scorer in the history of the St George club, Changa played 227 games for the Dragons, 33 Games for NSW and 34 games for Australia including 3 Kangaroo tours. An inspirational leader and tremendous point scorer with a limitless array of skills, Langlands achieved everything possible in the game and will be remembered as one of the all time greats.



Les Johns

A Newcastle junior, Johns shot to prominence in the early 1960s playing for the Bulldogs, Country Firsts and 14 Tests for Australia. Canterburys Golden Boy had a career of great highs yet constant injury. A true player of the 60s, Johns inspirational efforts as fullback, particularly in the 1967-68 Kangaroos Tour, ended in 1971 due to an ongoing knee problem.



Keith Barnes

One of the Leagues greatest goal kickers, Keith Golden Boots Barnes scored over 1500 points playing for Balmain in the 1960s. A Welshman by birth, Barnes captained Australia in 1959 and went on to play 14 Tests and 11 games for NSW. Named Player of the Year in 1963, Barnes famously proved why by scoring all of the Tigers points in their 1964 semi finals, final and grand final. After retiring in 1968, Barnes became General Manager of the Balmain Leagues Club and Balmain Chief Executive until 1994.



Ken Thornett

The Thornett grandstand at Parramatta Stadium is a constant reminder of The Mayors Rugby League legacy. While his brothers, Dick and John, forged successful careers in Rugby Union, Thornett made an early switch to League, dividing his loyalties between Parramatta and English club, Leeds. A ruthless attacker, Thornett played 12 Tests for Australia and in 1963 became the first Australian fullback to score a try in a test match while on a Kangaroos tour.







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Wingers
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Ken Irvine

In a career spanning 16 years, Irvine became one of the highest try scorers in rugby league history. Irvines 212 tries in 242 games for Manly and Norths is an amazing record that still stands. A champion sprinter, Irvine also held the world 100 yards record in the early 1960s. A veteran of 31 Tests for Australia and 24 games for NSW, Irvine sadly died of Leukemia in 1991.



Johnny King

The greatest try scorer in St George club history, King made Rugby League history by scoring tries in each of the Dragons 6 successive grand finals from 1960-1965. A brilliant left-flank winger, King played 13 Tests and 6 games for NSW during the 1960s before turning to coaching in the 1970s.



Eddie Lumsden

Another Dragons legend, Lumsden enjoyed nine grand final wins with St George from 1957-1966 and played 15 Tests for Australia in-between. Lumsden was the leading try scorer in 1962, yet retired only four years later, still on a high following the Dragons 11th grand final victory. Lumsden later took on the challenging role of Australian Test selector.



Peter Dimond

Picking up where his older brother (1950s Wests winger, Bobby) left, Dimond shone playing for the Magpies in the 1960s and holds the career record for tries with the former club. The Dapto junior played 10 Tests for Australia and was instrumental in retaining the Ashes from Great Britain in 1966.



Brian Carlson

A natural athlete who dominated the backline, Carlson played 74 games for Norths and 17 Test Matches in the 1950s. Despite his winning form, Carlson retired soon after captaining Australia in the first Test against New Zealand in 1961.



Michael Cleary

An Australian sporting legend, Cleary not only played league at the highest level, he was a Rugby Union international, and sprinted for Australia at the 1962 Commonwealth Games. Cleary played 8 Tests for Australia and won two premierships with South Sydney, scoring a famous length of the field try in the 1968 grand final win over Manly. Cleary was later elected to NSW Parliament and fittingly became the Minister for Sport.



Lionel Williamson

Hailing from Innisfail, Queensland, Williamson relocated to Newtown in the late 1960s at the peak of his career. A giant winger who rarely dropped the ball, Williams went on to win a grand final with Newtown and represent Australia in 5 Tests in the 1970s.



Brian James

Somewhat overshadowed among St Georges all-star team of the 1960s, it wasn't until James moved to Souths in 1966 that the fast winger won the recognition he deserved. After winning a grand final with the Rabbitohs in 1967, James played 2 games for NSW took part in Australias 1968 World Cup victory.




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Centres
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Graeme Langlands

A post war Rugby League immortal, words do little to justify the impact Langlands had on the game during the sixties and seventies. The greatest point scorer in the history of the St George club, Changa played 227 games for the Dragons, 33 Games for NSW and 34 games for Australia including 3 Ashes tours. An inspirational leader and tremendous point scorer with a limitless array of skills, Langlands achieved everything possible in the game and will be remembered as one of the all time greats.



Reg Gasnier

Arguably Australias greatest ever Rugby League player, Gasnier not only excelled on the field, his true sportsmanlike manner remains a legend. At 22 years, the Dragons centre became one of the youngest players ever to captain Australia. Blessed with balance, speed and poise, Puff the Magic Dragon was the games leading try scorer in 1960, 63 and 64. After a remarkable 16 games for NSW and 36 Tests for Australia, Gasnier shocked the league world by retiring in 1968, aged only 28.



Harry Wells

Born into a family of boxers, Wells heritage was obvious to anyone who saw the large and agile centre in action. Commencing his career with Souths in the 1950s, Wells went on to play 94 games for Wests, 27 for NSW and famously partnered Gasnier for 12 of his 20 Test appearances throughout the 1960s.




Bob Fulton

One of Rugby Leagues Immortals, Bozo guided Manly to three premierships in the 1960s and 70s, playing an integral part in their first two grand final wins. Cheeky and tenacious, the English-born centre played 20 Tests for Australia and eventually captained the national team. Throughout the 1980s Fulton coached Easts, Manly and the Kangaroos and in 1994 he was awarded an OAM for services to the game.



John Greaves

Reg Gasnier rated Greaves as one of the best centres he had ever seen. The St George junior played for both the Dragons and Canterbury in the 1960s, becoming captain of the Dogs in 1970. Greaves played 7 games for NSW and 8 Tests for Australia before retiring in the 1970s.



John McDonald

The towering centre/winger from Toowoomba played the first of his 13 Tests in 1966 and went on to captain Manly in 1970. A fast runner and prolific point scorer, McDonald played 9 games for Queensland and coached the first State of Origin Maroons side in 1980. McDonald later became president of the Queensland Rugby League.



Brian Moore

A master of the break, Chicka Moore was a popular fixture playing for Newtown in the 1960s and 70s. Selected for NSW 3 times, Moore also proved his worth on the1967-68 Kangaroo Tour, ending the tour as the top try scorer. Moore went on to captain the Jets in the early 70s and coached the last Newtown premiership grade team in 1983.



Barry Rushworth

The lanky centre enjoyed a long and solid career at Parramatta, while also representing Country and NSW throughout the 1960s. Rushworth made selection for the 1963-64 Kangaroos tour and in the twilight of his career, led Western Division to victory in the 1974 Amco Cup.




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Five Eighths
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Bob Fulton

One of Rugby Leagues Immortals, Bozo guided Manly to three premierships in the 1960s and 70s, playing an integral part in their first two grand final wins. Cheeky and tenacious, the English-born centre/five eighth played 20 Tests for Australia and eventually captained the national team. Throughout the 1980s Fulton coached Easts, Manly and the Kangaroos and in 1994 he was awarded an OAM for services to the game.



Brian Clay

Poppa Clay was an institution at St George in the 1950s and 60s, playing in all but one of their nine grand final wins during that period. The Newtown junior played 7 games for NSW and 5 Tests for Australia before retiring in 1967 after 200 first grade games.



Arthur Summons

Immortalised on the NRL premiership trophy, Summons captained both the Magpies and the Kangaroos in the 1960s, leading Australia to victory over Britain for the first time since 1911. The small halfbacks great defense and kicking game almost won Wests the 1963 grand final against the Dragons- Summons post-game embrace with St George captain, Norm Provan was captured afterwards in John OGreadys famous photo The Gladiators. Summons played 9 Tests for Australia and went on to coach the national side in 1970.




John Gleeson

Born in Toowoomba, Gleeson is regarded as one of Queenslands greatest ever rugby league players. Tough and uncompromising, Gleeson played 20 times for his state and represented the Kangaroos on ten occasions between 1964 68.




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Locks
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Johnny Raper

Without a doubt, one of the greatest players and personalities the game has ever produced. Raper was an unstoppable force during the 1960s. After a short stint at Newtown, Raper moved to St George, playing 185 games for the Dragons and winning eight grand finals. From 1959- 67 he made a phenomenal 33 Test appearances, toured with the Kangaroos 3 times and played in two World Cups. Brilliant in both defense and attack, Raper used his skills to coach Cronulla and Newtown in the 70s and 80s.



Ron Coote

One of the most distinctive players of the modern game, Coote assumed the Prince of Locks crown after Johnny Raper retired and helped Souths win four premierships from 1967-71. Tall and agile, Coote had a great running game and lethal cover defense. Coote played 13 games for NSW, the same number of Tests and captained the winning World Cup squad in 1970. After retiring in the late 70s, Coote served on the NSWRL Judiciary and later joined the Easts Board of Directors.



Ron Lynch

Born in Forbes NSW, Ron Thirsty Lynch came to Parramatta in 1961 and was elected club captain within a year. A solid and highly consistent lock, Lynch managed 12 Test appearances despite the serious competition from Raper and Coote and played lock in the 1967-68 Kangaroo tour. Lynch played 168 games for the Eels and ended his career in 1972 as captain of Penrith.



Brian Clay

Poppa Clay was an institution at St George in the 1950s and 60s, playing in all but one of their eleven grand final wins during that period. The Newtown junior played 7 games for NSW and 5 Tests for Australia before retiring in 1967 after 200 first grade games. Clay passed away in 1987 following a long battle with heart disease.




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Hookers
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Ian Walsh

A great hooker and an inspirational League captain, Walsh took the helm at the Dragons in 1966 only to see his team end their grand final winning streak in 1967. A Eurowra Junior, Walsh played for Western Division, Country, NSW and Australia before joining St George in 1961. Walsh captained the Kangaroos on the 1965 victorious tour of NZ and led the team to Ashes glory in 1966. After retiring, Walsh coached Parramatta and became a successful sports columnist.



Noel Kelly

The number two Hooker in Australia during the 1960s, Walsh enjoyed a long career at Wests and retired with an impressive 25 Tests to his name. Despite his larrikin reputation, Ned Kelly took his game seriously and became the first hooker/prop forward to make three Kangaroo tours. Kelly retired in 1971 after a season as captain-coach of Wollongong and coached Norths from 1973-76.




Brian Fitzsimmons

Born in Townsville, Fitzsimmons was a mainstay for Queensland during their interstate challenges with NSW in the sixties. Fitzsimmons represented the Kangaroos on three occasions between 1967 68 & 70 71.



Fred Jones

The rugged Manly hooker played an impressive 14 seasons with the Sea Eagles and captained the club to their first ever premiership win in 1972. During his long career, Jones played 4 games for NSW and was selected for the 1968 and 1972 World Cup tours. In 1974 Jones became the first Manly player to be granted a testimonial- honored for his ten years service to the club




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Second Rowers
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Norm Provan

A tall and strong second rower, Norman Sticks Provan played for St George in 10 winning grand finals from 1956-64, the last four as captain-coach. Born and bred in the Sutherland shire, Provan joined the Dragons in the early 1950s and went on to play 19 games for NSW and 14 Tests for Australia. Provans embrace with Wests captain, Arthur Summons, after the muddy 1963 grand final is one of the games most potent and enduring images. When Provan announced his retirement in 1965, 78,065 fans went to the SCG to watch the legends final game.



Ron Coote

One of the most distinctive players of the modern game, Coote helped Souths win four premierships from 1967-71. Tall and agile, Coote had a great running game and lethal cover defense. Coote played 13 games for NSW, the same number of Tests and captained the winning World Cup squad in 1970. After retiring in the late 70s, Coote served on the NSWRL Judiciary and later joined the Easts Board of Directors.



Bob McCarthy

An inventive and dynamic back-rower, McCarthy changed the nature of the game in the 1960s with his devastating bursts to the centre and huge try count. A Rabbitohs junior, McCarthy flourished under the guidance of Souths coach and legend Clive Churchill and played a crucial role in their four premiership wins between 1967-71. After a brief switch to Canterbury, McCarthy ended his prolific career, including 10 Tests, with Souths. Awarded the MBE in 1977, McCarthy turned to coaching after retirement and later took up a position on the NRL Judiciary.



Arthur Beetson

Beetson revolutionized the role of a front row forward. Strong and powerful with magical hands and an uncanny ability to offload the ball, Artie is regarded as the greatest attacking forward of all time. A veteran of 222 First grade games with Balmain, the Roosters and Parramatta, Beetson played 20 Interstate Games (for both NSW and QLD) and 14 Tests. A post war immortal, Beetson remains one of Rugby Leagues best loved characters.



Brian Hambly

The Souths junior started his League career as a lock. However the unsurpassable form of Johnny Raper meant that Grumpy Hambly moved to second row for his 18 Test Match appearances. After signing with Parramatta for the record transfer fee of 2500 pounds, Hambly proved his worth, captaining an extremely competitive Eels side in the mid 60s.



Dick Thornett

A League legend and a sporting rarity, Thornett played international Rugby Union and represented Australia in Water Polo at the 1960 Rome Olympics, before signing up with the Parramatta Eels in 1963. That year both Dick and his brother Ken played in the Test against South Africa- one of the few sibling Kangaroo pairings. A robust second row forward, Thornett went on to play 11 games for NSW, 11 Tests and in 1968, Thornett equaled the Eels club record for 4 tries in a game.



Ron Lynch

Born in Forbes NSW, Ron Thirsty Lynch came to Parramatta in 1961 and was elected club captain within a year. A solid and highly consistent player, Lynch managed 12 Test appearances, despite the serious competition from Raper and Coote, and played lock in the 1967-68 Kangaroo tour. Lynch played 168 games for the Eels and ended his career as captain of Penrith in 1972.



Dick Huddart

The British forward toured Australia with the Lions in 1962 and shocked the Kangaroos with his unbreakable defense and terrifying attacking bursts. In 1964 he signed on with the champion Dragons, however injuries kept him out of their successive grand finals until 1966. Huddart returned to England in 1970 and played his final season with his first club, Whitehaven.




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Props
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Noel Kelly

The first hooker/prop forward to play in three Kangaroo tours, Kelly enjoyed a long career at Wests and retired with an impressive 25 Tests to his name. A spirited and roguish player, Ned Kelly amused fans with his memorable send-offs. Kelly retired in 1971 after a season as captain-coach of Wollongong and coached Norths from 1973-76.




John ONeill

The tough prop from Gunnadah achieved four grand final wins for Souths and Manly between 1967-71, alongside 5 games for NSW and 2 Tests for Australia. A fierce defender, Lurch ONeill will long be remembered at Manly for his brutal display in the 1973 grand final against Cronulla. Two years later, O Neill returned to the Rabbitohs and took on the role of coach in 1977.



Arthur Beetson

Beetson revolutionized the role of a front row forward. Strong and powerful with magical hands and an uncanny ability to offload the ball, Artie is regarded as the greatest attacking forward of all time. A veteran of 222 First grade games with Balmain, the Roosters and Parramatta, Beetson played 20 Interstate Games (for both NSW and QLD) and 14 Tests. A post war immortal, Beetson remains one of Rugby Leagues best loved characters.



Peter Gallagher

The Taree junior played centre, five-eighth and fullback for Easts in the early 1960s and was named captain in 1965.



Billy Wilson

A gutsy and relentless forward, Wilson was first graded at St George in 1948, aged 18, and went on to play an amazing 20 seasons with the Dragons and Norths. Captain Blood, as he was known, won six premierships with St George and played 10 Tests for Australia, two as captain. Wilsons endurance and toughness is legendary; he played one semi-final with a broken arm and a gashed eye and was memorably sent off in the 1962 grand final for flattening rival forward Jim Cody.



John Wittenberg

The prop from Wide Bay played for Toowoomba in early sixties and represented Queensland and Australia before relocating to Sydney and St George in 1968. Unfortunately, a bitter dispute with QRL prompted Wittenburg to sit out the 1967 season and Kangaroo tour. He went on to play three seasons with the Dragons, 5 games for NSW and played the last of his 6 Tests against NZ in 1970.



John Sattler

A Souths icon, Sattler signed on with the club in 1962 and led the Rabbitohs into four grand final wins from 1967-71. In 1967 Sattler toured with the Kangaroos, and after captaining NSW he was given the Australian captaincy from 1969-70. A player that embodied the tough, raw spirit of League, Sattler famously played the majority of the 1970 grand final against Manly with a broken jaw. After moving to Queensland in the early 70s, Sattler became an ambassador for the first premiership Gold Coast team in the 1980s.



Kevin Ryan

The ultimate league hard man, Ryan was a fearless competitor and a highly effective ball-player prop. Born in Ipswitch, Ryan was an amateur boxing champion and a Rugby Union internationalist before he signed on with St George in 1960. After seven grand final wins with the Dragons Ryan took up an offer at Canterbury, and as captain-coach of the berries, ended his former teams reign as premiers. Ryan continued as Bulldogs coach after his retirement from first grade and used his experience as a lawyer to win the state seat of St George in 1976 and a place in the Wran government. Ryan later became president of the Players Association.




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Half Backs
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Billy Smith

A tenacious and formidable halfback, Smith wore the Dragons jersey for 14 years and represented Australia in 18 Tests. The two time winner of the Harry Sunderland Medal (for best Australian player in an Ashes series) captained Australia in the late 1960s and formed a legendary partnership with Graeme Langlands. Smith ended his career playing reserve grade in late 1970s, but not before passing Norm Provans record of 296 grade games.



Barry Muir

Regarded as one of the pioneers of State of Origin rugby league, Muir was a Queenslander through and through. Clever and exceptionally quick, Muir terrorized opponents while playing for Brisbane Wests and although big spending Sydney clubs did their best to entice the half back to move south, none were successful. A veteran of 22 Tests for Australia, Muir etched his name in rugby league folklore by famously naming NSW cockroaches.



Arthur Summons

Immortalised on the NRL premiership trophy, Summons captained both the Magpies and the Kangaroos in the 1960s, leading Australia to victory over Britain for the first time since 1911. The small halfbacks great defense and kicking game almost won Wests the 1963 grand final against the Dragons- Summons post-game embrace with St George captain, Norm Provan was captured afterwards in John OGreadys famous photo The Gladiators. Summons played 9 Tests for Australia and went on to coach the national side in 1970.




Dave Bolton

The British half-back joined Balmain in the mid 1960s and paved the way for the Tigers shock 1969 grand final win over Souths. Bolton retired in 1970 and coached Parramatta from 1973-74.



Ron Lynch

Born in Forbes NSW, Ron Thirsty Lynch came to Parramatta in 1961 and was elected club captain within a year. A solid and highly consistent player, Lynch managed 12 Test appearances despite the serious competition from Raper and Coote and played lock in the 1967-68 Kangaroo tour. Lynch played 168 games for the Eels and ended his career in 1972 as captain of Penrith.
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galahs
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Legendary names grace 60s league team

Gasnier, Langlands, Raper and Fulton were among the names included in rugby league's team of the 1960s, unveiled at a ceremony at Sydney's Luna Park last night.

St George dominates the team with six internationals in the line-up after winning seven of their 11 straight prermierships during the decade.

Four players from the team of the 1970s also made the side: Bob Fulton, Arthur Beetson, Ron Coote and Graeme Langlands.

Langlands was chosen at centres in the 70s side but moved to full-back in the 60s outfit.

Immortal Johnny Raper praised the concept.

"This is where rugby league differs from other sports, we never forget the past," he said.

"It's good to see rugby league has never forgotten about us and we really appreciate that."

NRL chief executive David Gallop paid tribute to all the greats of the sixties and congratulated the winners.

"It's one of our game's golden periods with five of our seven Immortals playing in the 60s," he said.



Team of the 60s

Les Johns (Canterbury Bankstown),
Ken Irvine (Norths),
Reg Gasnier (St George),
Graeme Langlands (St George),
Johnny King (St George),
Bob Fulton (Manly Warringah),
Billy Smith (St George),
Arthur Beetson (Balmain),
Ian Walsh (St George),
Noel Kelly (Wests),
Dick Thornett (Parramatta),
Ron Coote (Souths),
Johnny Raper (St George).
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